What is Sound?

What is sound? If you watched this video from earlier posts, you know, and could see that it’s air in motion.

When we’re talking about voice and sound, we mean either talking or singing – right? (Luckily, they use exactly the same parts of our bodies.)

First, let’s talk about getting our bodies to do a better job of putting air in motion when we’re making sounds!

Anybody ever heard of a body-part called a “diaphragm?” Many choir directors will tell their singers to “breath from your diaphragm,” (but possibly don’t explain further).

Here’s a simple exercise to help you feel exactly where your diaphragm is, and what it feels like when you make it work.

WARNING: Do NOT Do This Exercise More Than Once Or Twice. If you feel light-headed STOP IMMEDIATELY! It just means you’re not used to getting so much oxygen!

  1. Sit down on the edge of a solid surface like a chair or sofa.
  2. Scrunch forward so your elbows are on your knees and your chin is in your hands.
  3. Now make one or two emphatic “HA’s” like you’re panting.
  4. You should feel your midsection make quick movements every time you say “HA.”
  5. That’s your diaphragm lifting up to expel the air out of your lungs to make the sound.

Now try standing up, putting one hand on your midsection, and saying “HA.” You should feel the same movement. If not, get into your crouching position again and do one last “HA.”

REMEMBER: Do NOT Do This Exercise More Than Once Or Twice.

Why? Because your head may not be used to so much oxygen getting into your body and you may feel light-headed. (The same reason why beginning woodwind and brass players of any age are told the same thing!)

Here’s a moving model of a working diaphragm

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